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and shear. it's washington your weight. >> two committees held a joint hearing on the situation in somalia. some of the issues examined by members included famine, terrorism, piracy and government corruption. witnesses included several current and former state department officials including the principal deputy assistant secretary of state for african affairs. this to an to an half hour hearing chaired by representative christopher smi smith. >> subcommittee will come to order, and good afternoon, everyone. we are holding today's hearing for the purpose of examining u.s. policy regarding the failed state of somalia, the possibly of recognizing a break what areas such as somaliland, and a continuing problem of somali piracy around which the obama administration has built a program. somalia's instability has encouraged other criminal activity beyond its borders endangering the stability of the entire horn of africa. somalia once again heads the annual list of failed states. and the current issue of "foreign policy" magazine. this featured african country has held the dubious distinction for
and famine in east africa. the un begins air lifting food into somalia. more democracy. the response to last friday's attacks in norway. the clock is ticking as london gets ready to host the 2012 summer olympics. the food is finally coming in. the united nations has begun airlifting food to eastern africa, trying to ease what is being called the world's worst humanitarian crisis. 12 million people from somalia to kenya to ethiopia are threatened by famine. hundreds of thousands are in camps, waiting for something to eat. >> emergency food supplies are on their way from kenya to somalia. the u.n. says it is faster to deliver aid by air than by road. the packets contain food rich in protein and energy. they are meant for severely malnourished children. >> there are 110 within the next few days, and 80 after that. we're sending it to supplementary feeding centers. >> every minute counts. this young boy desperately needs food. his mother brought him from somalia to the refugee camp in kenya. he is almost one year old, but ways just 3 kilograms, like a newborn. >> he should be 8 kilos to 9 kilos.
, looking at the situation in somalia, including famine, piracy, terrorism, and government corruption. congressman chris smith of new jersey serve as the chairman for this hearing. -- served as the chairman for this hearing. >> somalia once again head the annual list of failed states. the current issue of foreign policy magazine. this country has held that dubious distinction for the past four years. sudan, chad, zimbabwe, and the democratic republic of congo are on the list. but since 1991, the united states has been involved in addressing the consequences of somalia have been no functioning government in mogadishu to effectively rule the entire country. this lack of government has resulted in somalia being engaged in the chaotic civil war. humanitarian, political, and security conditions continue to deteriorate across somalia. in the past two years, more than 22,000 civilians have been killed. an estimated 1.1 million people have been displaced. at least 476,000 simoleons -- somalis have fled to neighboring countries. they are experiencing what is considered the worst drought in the
.s. policy regarding the failed state of somalia, the possibly of recognizing breakaway areas and the continuing problem of somali piracy around which the obama administration has built a program. the instability has encouraged other criminal activity beyond the borders, endangering the entire horn. somali heads the annual list of failed states in the current issue of foreign policy magazine. this eastern african country is held for the past four years. sudan, chad, zimbabwe, and the democratic republic of congo has experienced horrific conditions. none of them could over take somalia at the top of the list. since the fall of presidency, in 1991, the united states has been involved in addressing the consequences of somalia, have no function in government that effectively rules the entire country. this lax of governance has resulted in somalia being engaged in a chaotic civil war. humanitarian, political insecurity conditions continue to deteriorate. in the past two years, 22,000 civilians have killed. 1.1 million people displaced and 465,000 have fled to neighboring countries.
am george thomas. >> and i am wendy griffith. somalia is suffering from the world's worst famine in a generation. a severe drought is put an estimated 11 people at risk. tens of thousands have already died. >> and many more forced to flee their homeland. >> they are moving because they have lost all their stock as a result of the drought, and no other hope. >> worst drought in 60 years in southern parts of the country. somalia racked by little rain. malnutrition rates are among the highest. 1 mother makes a desperate plea for health. >> we are dying in the absence of humanitarian assistance, where is the u.n., where is the muslim world? we are suffering so the world should take action to save our lives. >> the united states is looseening rules meant to prevent funds from falling into the hands of al-qaeda-linked groups, al-shabab. >> aid going to refugee camps has no real down side. this is a massive humanitarian crisis wh 11 million people threatened by it. the concern policy makers have the aid organizations forceed to pay taxes to al-shabab or kick backs, this is something fin
with a new orchestra. it's midday here in london. 7:00 a.m. in washington and 2:00 p.m. in somalia. that's where the militant group denies that there is a family inin the country. they say the u.n. is exaggerating the drought severity for political reasons, therefore aid restrictions will remain in place. still the u.n. is saying it will work where it's feasible. >> thousands fleeing somalia. i must warn you, you may find this report from our correspondent distressing. >> they fled from southern somalia where they claim there is no famine, that the u.n.'s declaration of one is political. a baby's body lies next to those still fighting. still fighting for their lives. the crude measure of this humanitarian crisis. the combination of war and drought have created a devastating emergency. the capital mowing did issue is not safe. but it's still a magnet for people in need. >> this is habiba. she is 8 years old and taking care five children. the father and mother died because of disease. >> al sha bad which has links to al qaeda controls the area where somalis are now starving to death. it's
crisis action. and war in somalia. the recruitment of child soldiers is said to be systematic. it's 9:00 a.m. here in singapore. >> it's 2:00 a.m. here in london. broadcasting to viewers on pbs and around the world, this is "newsday"." >> the british prime minister david cameron will make statements to the house of commons later, the start of an all-day debate in the latest developments in the phone hacking scandal. it follows the dramatic testimony on tuesday by rupert murdoch. appearing before m.p.'s, the media tycoon said it was the most humble day of his life but he refused to take personal responsibility for the crisis which engulfs the news world. he appeared before a select committee by his son james. nick robinson reports. >> end to britain's most powerful, most feared media going you will. the policemen are there to protect rupert and james murdoch, not take that -- them into questioning. that fell into a crew of m.p.'s. his wife was behind him. offering physical and emotional support. his son and once heir apparent sat anxiously at his side throughout. >> i would like to say
]wwwwwwwww [applause]w [inaudible conversations] .. a terrorist group the two joined the fighting in somalia. to the house and homeland security committee. now the third in the series of hearings held by focuses on the other recruitment efforts in canada and the u.s.. this is two hours and 15 minutes. >> the homeland security committee will come to order. we are meeting today to hear testimony on the efforts of al-shabaab to recruit and radicalize the muslim american community. the chair wishes to remind the guests today the demonstrations in the audience including the use of science and t-shirts as well as verbal outbursts and violations of the rules of the house and maintaining order and proper decorum. and also my opening statement i think the ranking member for being willing to accommodate the change for the timing of the hearing this morning scheduled for 9:40 because of the republican conference going on in the debt ceiling and the ranking member was kind enough to accept that change without requiring the procedural moves once again thanks for your cooperation. >> today we hold a third
. >> lehrer: then, from somalia, we have a report on the worst drought in a generation. and ray suarez examines the effort to get food to millions at risk of starvation. >> we're hopeful that we can push further into southern somalia in the coming days an weeks. we have to try. we can't not try. it's just too serious. >> woodruff: kwame holman updates the impasse over getting a deal to reduce the deficit and avert a government default. >> lehrer: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown gets a rare inside look at a syrian city where anti- government demonstrations have grown bigger and bolder from anthony shadid of "the new york times." >> reporter: hama is syria's fourth largest city. it's a significant place, and since last month when security forces withdrew, you've seen, i think, a notion of freedom emerge there. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced t
. >> the hardline islamic group al-shabab has links to al qaeda and is fighting the western government of somalia. the government is in control of olli the center of the capital. is these areas where somalis are starving to death. al-shabab has made clear it will continue the activities -- to disrupt the activities of agencies. >> agencies we band before are still banned. some were involved in political activity. others were destroying the lives of our people and we had to ban them too. the last u.n. said -- a u.n. report says there is famine in somalia. we say this is 100% baseless and sheer propaganda. >> the u.n. and the international community face a mammoth challenge. >> it is very dangerous and risky, but we have to reach people. they are not making it all the way to mogadishu. these other ones lucky enough to make a year and these centers are overrun. >> in northeastern kenya, they need food aid simply to survive. but it is the conflict in somalia that has created the famine that is the worst in decades. >> for more on the challenges in getting aid to those who need it most in somalia, i a
are at risk from hunger in somalia, kenya, ethiopia and djibouti. somalia is the worst hit by famine, drought and a civil war with islamic militants. nearly half a million refugees have left somalia to go to kenya. most are headed to the dadaab camp just inside the border. we begin with a report from martin geissler of "independent television news." he's spent a week reporting from the camp. a warning: some of the images are distressing. >> reporter: the patients just keep on arriving. there is no weekend for the staff at hagadera's children's unit. time here is measured in bed space. today as ever the ward is packed, but the doctors are happy. two of the babies causing most concern are improving. when manaj was admitted on monday, he was close to death. at seven months old, he weighed just 6.5 pounds. five days on he's improving. still weak and still frail, but still alive. >> ( translated ): surviving a nearly a week. he fought for his life. we are giving him the best of care. >> reporter: he's had quite a week hasn't he? >> yes, quite a week, yeah that's great. >> reporter: at the start of
of africa, says emergency food agencies. the drought is facing parts of kenya, ethiopia, and somalia. the situation in somalia is complicated even further by a conflict between pro-government forces and the insurgents -- a bad. -- al-shabab. here is this report. >> clouds over somalia, but no rain. if we are heading to a region close to the famine zone. gunmen on the ground, but these men work for somalia's government, backed by the west, and they control a small pocket of territory here. it has become a magnet for families desperate for food and safety. first, we see some makeshift camps in the wilderness. then the latest arrivals. this family got here a few hours ago, escaping from a town controlled by the militants islamist group, al-shabab. they count themselves lucky. >> they are killing people at home. al-shabab has prevented aid from reaching our area. that is why we have to flee. those left behind will die. >> the goal now is to stop more people from fleeing their homes by getting eight more into the heart of somalia. it is not impossible, but it is slow, complicated, and ver
economies of the region. hello and welcome. also, famine declared in parts of somalia, how will the united nations reads the politically unstable country? >> its place in history and the space shuttle pulls into port for the last time. it's voyaged at an end. >> atlantis makes its final descent to earth, ending nasa's 30-year shuttle program. , 7:00 a.m. in london and florida, 1:00 p.m. in brussels where in the militancy of summits of euro zone leaders is under way. they're trying to find solutions to a debt crisis which has snowballed across greece, ireland, and portugal. the challenge is preventing the prices from pitting spain and italy, which could reach critical levels. chris morris reports. >> for the past year, whenever european leaders have met, there has been one issue at the top of the agenda again and again. trying to fix the euro. the survival of the single currency has been called into question. there are increasingly urgent appeals for euro zone leaders to act decisively. >> they have said they will do what it takes to ensure the stability of their area. now is the time to ma
in somalia, the u.s. says it will allow its 8 into areas -- rebels say they will allow aid workers into the area. >> of the british prime minister, david cameron, has defended his integrity in parliament as ministers defended the phone hacking scandal. the british establishment has been really. mr. cameron defended hiring andy coulson but he said that in hindsight he would not have made the same choice. this report contains flash photography. >> a french in need -- a friend in need is a friend. they become a massive headache. david cameron has always defended his decision to give andy coulson a second chance. >> with 20/20 hindsight, i would not have offered him the job and i expect he would not have taken it. you don't make decisions in hindsight, you make them in the present. you live and you learn, believe you me, i have led. >> the prime minister said he was extremely sorry. what he -- was he ready to say sorry for hiring him? >> if it turns out that i had been lied to, that would be a moment for a profound apology. >> few expected him to go that far. >> that is not good enough
aid to the city. that is in somalia. almost half the entirely population you are intelligently needs food and aid and millions of children are already severely malnourished. we have this report. >> the world food program stayed first earlier will be -- given the scale in somalia, it's a drop in the ocean. drought has hit so hard and more than 1/3 of the children are severely malnourished. aide agents say with so many children in this precarious situation, there's a danger disease could break out. >> in somalia almost half of the population you are intelligently needs food aid. rations have been cut in recent months and now there's a massive fundraising effort. several organizations are managing to access areas held by the islammist insurgent group al sha bad. but some analysts are questioning why this emergency was not prevented. in somalia, people can't wait for the tied reach them. war and drought are sending them to apology camps. the arduous journey takes its toll on the week. today the latest victim of the drought was tried rest in the camp. "bbc news," nairobi. >> now for the b
to begin today to somalia and kenya. now it will fly on wednesday. 11 million people are threatened by famine, hundreds of thousands are waiting for food in camps all along the horn of africa. >> they keep on streaming into kenya even of the camp is bursting at the scenes. there are 400,000 people here and much more are arrive every day. many are in a desperate state. the international community is planning to deliver aid directly to somalia. >> we have to make every effort possible to bring help inside somalia both to prevent people from having to take the long walk to assistance across borders and then potentially create a refugee problem. also, because time is not our friend. >> the situation in somalia is dire. at this makeshift camp in mogadishu, the islamist rebels on not as strong here in the capital as in the south here. -- are not as strong here in the capital as in the south. here, there is fertile food, drinking water, or medicine. >> we have been displaced by a terrible drought. we need help. >> supplies needed to arrive fast and in large amounts to save the lives of hun
international aid to stop the crisis from spreading. >> now it is official. somalia is sinking into famine. it is the first time that compelling word has been deployed in almost 20 years. the united nations is hoping it will idle its the world into action triggered a conflict has already driven -- into action. the conflict has already driven people into camps like this one. the former irish president was here during the last famine. now she is back wondering why the world could not prevent it from happening again. >> since i was here in 1992, and when i looked around and see again, and these are very resilient people, and they want the best. they want food and water for their families. >> of substantial aid operation is already under way. supplies are arriving in neighboring kenya, but the uae is asking for 185 million pounds immediately. international response has been mixed. britain has given 23 million accounts. the united states early have five. germany and france are among those accused of ignoring alarm bells. >> they have been dangerously inadequate. britain is setting a good lead,
to the communities. >> it is not true? >> categorically. there are organizations in somalia able to withstand and as long as we rely on experience with the chiefs are determined by in their communities, we can help many in somalia. substantial increase of funding may mean less experienced organizations or individuals. they may actually in danger the lives of others. >> a difficult situation, trying to deal with them and this allied group? >> it is a complicated and firemen. they are not unanimous. they are like a dragon with many heads. not only the overall situation for somalia. >> you can get into the famine zones? you can make it possible for many persons in somalia to have medical support. creating a bigger attitude problem in the future. >> stay with us. still to come, the marketplace deadline moves. raising the u.s. debt ceiling. 4.5 months after the japanese power station was crippled by an earthquake and tsunami, workers are still trying to cool down the reactors. the government has been forced to enforce the 20 kilometer exclusion. authorities are now allowing some evacuees brief vis
security officials raise the red flag on a group related to al qaeda and they are centered in somalia. they reportedly plan to recruit americans and attack american interests in europe and the u.s. mainland. >> the information is alarming. recruiting americans as terrorist to strike out against their own country. the terror group was able to pull recruits from several u.s. states, i including virginia. a threat seemingly half a world away but with roots here at home set alarms often washington. >> probably the next most significant terrorist threat may emanate from the al qaeda presence in somalia. >> that al qaeda presence -- before osama bin laden died, he was urging the group to target the u.s.. the group's recruitment tactics has authorities on high alert. >> not al qaeda or any of its affiliates have come close to drawing sellout muslim americans and westerners to jihad. >> at least 40 americans of a somali dissent fought alongside radicals in somalia and last three years, including three suicide bombers. authorities say the group recruited american fighters from acros
-terrorism and intelligence sharing between the security agencies. >> declared in parts of somalia, an estimated 10 million people have been affected by severe drought. the united nations is expected, who has returned to east africa. andrew has more. thousands crowding into camps like this one. a fan is about to be declared in at least two regions of somalia. the mud of word is rarely used. images like these, ethiopia, 1984. somalia has now crossed a grand threshold. -- grim threshold. 4 out of every 10,000 children are dying daily. >> the international response mechanisms have triggered as a result of declaring a completely different emergency. it is a completely different scale. >> the horn of africa is prone to drought and poverty. in a recent visit, two decades worth of anarchy. people are coming here in search of food. militants control most of the countryside. an ounce they were lifting a ban on the organizations. the un says that too many obstacles remain. they are hoping that famine will provoke a surge in donations. but the short term looks bleak. the longer-term as much better. >> children in som
children. will ross reports. >> the cargo, 10 tons of food for severely malnourished children in somalia. this therapeutic peanut paste is a lifesaver. it is a race against time. >> we will be bringing in 100 tons within the next few towns -- few days, and 80 tons will be going to mogadishu where it will be distributed to different feeding centers form on our children. >> the food program says the first airlift will feed three and a half thousand children for the next month. but given the scale of a problem in somalia, this is just a drop in the ocean. the drought has hit so hard in parts of the south, over one- third of all children are civilian -- severely malnourished. aid agencies say with so many children in a precarious situation there is a danger that disease could break out. in somalia, almost half the population urgently needs food aid. russians have been cut in recent months. now there is a massive -- rations have been cut in recent months. now there's a massive drive for food aid. somali ministers have complained that the food aid is moving too slowly. delicate negotiations co
the crisis now facing parts of kenya, ethiopia and somalia. the situation in somalia is complicated even further by conflict between pro-government forces and the islamist insurgent al-shabab. our correspondent has been to the government-controlled area where foreign aid is starting to arrive. >> clouds over somalia but no rain. we're heading to a region close to the famine zone. gunmen on the ground, but these men work for somalia's government backed by the west. they control a small pocket of territory here. it's a magnet for families desperate for food and safety. first we see makeshift camps in the wilderness, then the latest arrivals. this family arrived a few hours ago, escaping from a town controlled by the islamist militant group al-shabab, they're exhausted but count themselves lucky. >> al-shabab -- they're killing people at home, al-shabab are preventing aid from reaching our area. that's why we had to flee. those left behind will die. the battle now is to stop more people fleeing their homes by getting aid directly into the heart of somalia's famine zone. that's not impossibl
. >> a pleasure. >> if in somalia, an effort to airlift emergency supplies into mogadishu is underway. today his mission is the first of 10 being carried out by the world food program in response to severe droughts, which are ravaging the horn of africa. they are being transferred to mogadishu from kenya to feed malnourished children. our correspondent has this report. >> the cargo, and 10 tons for severely malnourished children. this their feuded pace is a lifesaver. it is a race against time -- this at nutritional paste is an lifesaver. these times will be going into mogadishu, where it will be distributed for malnourished children. the world food program says the first airlift will feed 3.5000 children for the next month, but given the scale of the problem in somalia, it is just a drop in the ocean. the drought has hit so hard, in parts of the south, over one- third of all children are malnourished. aid agencies say there is a danger that disease could break out. in somalia, almost half of the entire population urgently needs food aid. rations have been cut in recent months. now, there is a m
has been particularly cruel to somalia, kenya, uganda, and ethiopia. more than 300,000 people have walked days to get to the refugee camp in kenya. ben brown has been there for a week. >> among the refugees at this camp, there are hundreds of lost children and orphans. some got separated from their families on the long walk from somalia. others, like abdi and his sister, no longer have parents. their father died in somalia's civil war. last month, their mother was killed as well. >> it is better here. back in somalia, there was war. we have no relatives there, so we fled here. we now have a foster mother to look after us. >> in the camp hospital, these children have parents, but little else. drought and war mean their bodies have been horribly weakened by malnutrition. by the time they reach this clinic, it can be too late. the doctors in this clinic are working frantically to save as many lives as they can. too often, they have to register the names of their patience in this, the "death book." inside, the names of the children who have died recently are registered by date. on some
the worst of 60 years made worse by a long-running conflict in somalia between pro government forces and the rest. now reporting from the town of dahla. >> crowds -- clouds over somalia. but no rain. we're heading close to the family inzone. government on the ground. but these men work for sow mallian government. they control a small pocket of territory here. it's become a maddening rush of families desperate for food and safety. first we see some make-shift camps in the wilderness. then the latest arrivals. the nor family got here a few hours ago escaping from a town taken over. they count themselves lucky. they are exhausted. >> they are killing people at home al sha bad are preventing aid from reaching our area. that's why we have to flee. those left behind will die. there's food here. foreign aid starting to arrive within somalia, itself. >> so what have you been given here? >> how long will this feed a family. >> she says 10 days. it's progress, but it's patched. >> the battle now so stop more people from kneing their homes by getting the aid directly into the family inzone. tha
a human tide of refugees. the drought is severe. the humanitarian crisis is centered in somalia but also kenya, ethiopia and djibouti, devastating crops and livestock and sources of drinking water. the u.n. estimates more than 11 million people are in urgent need of food assistance, including millions of children. we have a report tonight from the kenya-somalia border, and a reminder, again, these are some tough images. >> reporter: famine has returned to africa. in this village it hasn't rained heavily for two years so children are starving, desperately in need of help. >> they really need it immediately. it's a matter of urgency, and some of them they cannot even wait. >> reporter: millions of people have been forced to flee their homes. 400,000 have come to this refugee camp in eastern kenya, most from somalia, and every day 1,500 more arrive, escaping war as well as famine. to get here abby has walked for almost a month with her five children. along her way, she was joined by other families crossing the border, too. this woman left home with her 12-year-old boy, mother and son togeth
of africa. a triangle of hunger along the borders of somalia, kenya and ethiopia. the u.n. says more than 11 million people urgently need help. in somalia alone, tens of thousands may have already died from famine. nbc has traveled to the region and filed this report from a refugee camp in dadaab in northeast kenya. >> reporter: new graves are being dug in dadaab for those who made it here but made it too late. hunger and disease are killing many people, even within the camp. 1,000 new refugees arrived today. zana and her family were amongst them. with her uncle and two sick children, she's walked for 15 days from somalia. having made it to the edge of the camp, they struggle to find shelter, food and water. they seem helpless and they leave us to search the outskirts for a place to stay. dadaab is turning into a city. that's the fastest growing city in the world. and every few days on the outskirts, a new settlement springs up just like this one on land that was previously uninhabited. across the border in somalia, distributing food is difficult and dangerous. in the town of dolo today, the
in the hot seat. >> you live and learn, and i have learned. >> fighting famine in somalia. suffering from the word food crisis in two decades. it -- the worst food crisis in two decades. and making an impression on the world of basketball and beyond. welcome. the shock waves from the phone hacking scandal continued to reverberate, and today it was david cameron who is feeling the impact before parliament. an emergency session, cameron defended hiring the former news of the world editor, but in hindsight, he added he would not make the same choice. not enough, said his critics. we have the details, and there is some flash photography curator of the parks a friend in need is a friend until they have raided photography. >> a friend in friend is a friend -- a friend in need is a friend indeed. >> with all the has followed, i would not have offered him the job, and i suspect he would not have taken it, but you do not make decisions in hindsight. you make them in the present. >> he said he was extremely sorry but was not ready to say sorry for hiring him, not yet at least. >> if it turns out i
. in the warning from the united nations as it tries to attack the famine in somalia. the u.s. senate has rejected a bill to raise america's debt ceiling passed earlier by a republican-controlled house of representatives. the vote has been expected. there are intense talks to reach a compromise. the leader of the democrats in the u.s. senate, harry reid, says it is typical. >> it is the worst possible time to conduct a filibuster. and they are forcing us to wait until tomorrow morning to have this vote. our economy hangs on the balance. for the first time in history, we are headed for economic disaster if we do not reach a compromise. [inaudible] [unintelligible] there was a meeting in my office with republicans this morning that fell through. we have heard a lot of talk about being interested in a compromise, but they need to move forward. they are refusing to negotiate with us. all they do is talk. the house will hold an up or down vote i was told on my proposal. it is time for us to be adults, and come together in a compromise for the american people. >> george is in washington and has been wat
. sharon. to you have news about aid for famine victims in somalia. >> united states is saying it will allow aid to be sent to famine-affected areas of somalia controlled by the as noneas non-- as long of it benefits the militia. they've been ravaged by one of the worst droughts in more than half a century. >> it is official. somalia is sinking into famine. it is the first time that compelling word has been deployed in almost 20 years. the united nations is hoping it will dilute the world into action. extreme drought and conflict have driven thousands of somalis into camps like t one. a former irish president was here during the last famine. she is back and wondering cheerfully why the world could not prevented from happening again. -- she is back and wondering tearfully why the world could not prevent it from happening again. >> i was here in 1992. i am here again. these people just want food and water for their families. >> a substantial aid operation is already under way. supplies arrived in neighboring kenya. the u.n. is asking for an extra 185 million pounds immediately. t
affected by the drought. the crisis has been particularly devastating in parts of somalia, you can't, kenya, and ethiopia. more than three have a thousand people have walked for days to get the refugee camps -- more than 300,000 people have walked for days to get to the refugee camps. >> among the refugees, hundreds of lost children and orphans, some separated from their families on the long walk from somalia. others no longer have any parents, their father dying in somalia possible war, then last month their mother was killed as well. >> it is better here. back in somalia, there was a war. we have no relatives there, so we fled here. >> in the hospital, these children have parents, but precious little else. drought and war mean their bodies have been horribly weakened by malnutrition. by the time they reached the clinic, it can be too late. the doctors are working frantically to save as many lives as they can, but too often they have to register the names of their patients in this, the clinic's death book. inside, the names of the children who died are registered by date. on sundays, two o
1300 people are trekking across somalia to a refugee camp in eastern canada. >> the aid workers here are pretty overstretched. this is a very overcrowded camp. there are new arrivals coming in every single day. the total number of people, 380,000. that is expected to rise to 400,000, maybe half a million. this is already the size of a city. at the moment, that aid agencies are struggling to cope. some of the people arriving are so weak and malnourished, they have walked maybe four days, maybe four weeks from somalia. they are fleeing the civil war, there is also intensifying drought. what tends to happen is that the men folk stood behind in somalia and sent on their women and children and maybe the elderly. some of the people are arriving here are the very weakest. the real tragedy is that when children sometimes arrive at this camp, they are almost at their weakest and they can die within a day or so of writing. what the workers are doing is to sort out the weakest cases they measure the children, they weigh them. they take the weakest and they take them to an intensive center where
are affected in the region, and famine has been declared in two areas of somalia. the bbc's andrew harding is in southwestern somalia, where basic food supplies are getting through, but much more is still needed. >> we're in southwestern somalia. it's a pocket of relative stability in this country, and that's why all these people are coming here, many of them watching, many of them hitching rides on donkey tops, on vehicles to get here, to get this aid, which is slowly starting to arrive. humanitarian communities managing at last to get the necessary aid into at least part of somalia. you can see families here starting to take oil and other basic food supplies up. the problem, though, is finding a way to keep these people in their homes in the first place, to stop this flood, this constant flood of 1,700 people arriving here every day. and that means getting aid deeper into somalia, into the famine zone itself, into areas controlled by al shabbat. now, it's not impossible. aid is getting through. some organizations have a relationship with individual commanders on the ground, in shabbat-co
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